Depersonalisation

Glass shards flew past my head as I was flung forward by inertia, stinging my face with an array of small splinters. I crossed my arms in front of my eyes to shield them from the shards. A loud screeching noise pervaded my mind, as did the smells of burnt rubber and curdled gas. I was filled with an overwhelming sense of dread. Suddenly, I was catapulted through the air. Then, water began to pour into the car. Everything went black.

Beep, beep, beep. I jolt up, flailing my hands through my bed-sheets like a drowning child. My heart beats erratically. I am struggling for breath. My body feels eerily light as if I am, in fact, swimming in water. I am soaked in sweat. I feel tugged by a nagging feeling that I had just dreamt something important, something that could explain this drowning feeling. Yet, I remember nothing. I drop my head into my palms, my clammy fingers clasping bundles of my thick, brown hair.

Nothing.

Sighing, I tear the sheets off of me and twist myself out of bed. I begin down the hallway. The ground seems to move away from me. My sight becomes blotted and dark. My hand falls onto the wall for support as I walk. I reach the kitchen, where I find my mum cooking breakfast. She looks up at me with a troubled look on her face. Then, her rosy skin darkens, her eyes morph into two knobs, her nose flattens, and her full-lipped mouth transforms into a green line. My heart stammers and so does the line where her mouth used to be. She leans forward and, in a metallic voice, says, “Wake up or die.”

I gasp in horror. My chest feels stabbed with acute pain. Am I having a heart attack? I hear my second alarm sounding from my bedroom. I turn from my mum-turned-cyborg and run back to my room to stop the beeping. As I run, the air feels heavy like water. Will I make it before my alarm times out? As I am a foot away from the alarm, I dive for the off-switch, reaching my index finger out in front of me. My long finger makes contact with the button and it clicks into place.

My eyes open. A man hovers over me with a defibrillator in his hands and a heart monitor next to him. “Oh, thank God. You woke up!”

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